Guidelines for Visitors

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Guidelines For Visitors

Free Administration & Free Parking
Before you visit, please be aware of the following guidelines:
• Speed Limit: 10 Kilometres per hour
• Soliciting are prohibited
• Drone planes are prohibited
• Smoking and/or vaping (e-cigarette) prohibited
• Meat, fish and/or poultry prohibited
• Alcoholic beverages prohibited
• Bicycles, rollerblading or skateboarding prohibited
• Medical or recreational use of marijuana prohibited
• No pets allowed, except a service animal
• (Non-Commercial) Photos and video outdoor only
• No advertising, commercial photography or wedding photography and/or video allowed without approval/permission
• Visitors Parking only, others will be towed at owner’s expense
• Loud music, private gathering, and/or tailgate party in the parking lot prohibited
• Picnics are not allowed within the Temple grounds
• Children are to be supervised at all times.
• Overnight parking prohibited
• Please remove shoes and hats before entering the shrines
• Dress code required. Please wear appropriate attire and be suitably covered:
• No sleeveless shirts/blouses, tank tops, singlets, shorts, shorts skirts, slippers/flip-flops or thongs

Upon entering the property, visitors must Agree to abide by these rules and regulations.
We reserve the right to refuse service to anyone who violates them.

Home 2018

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Chung Tian Temple

Monday closed
Tuesday ~ Friday 10:00am ~ 3:30pm
Saturday ~ Sunday 9:00am ~ 4:30pm

Address: 1034 Underwood Road, Priestdale, Qld 4127
T:(07) 3841 3511 E:info@fgschungtian.org.au


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Contact Us

Official Hours:

Monday closed
Tuesday ~ Friday 10:00am ~ 3:30pm
Saturday ~ Sunday 9:00am ~ 4:30pm

Address:
1034 Underwood Road, Priestdale, Qld 4127
T:(07) 3841 3511
E:info@fgschungtian.org.au

Mailing Address:
PO Box 221,
Rochedale South, QLD 4123

Visit Temple by Bus

Chung Tian Temple is located at 1034 Underwood Road, Priestdale, Qld 4127. It is a short walk from bus stops. To plan your journey, visit www.translink.com.au or call TransLink on 13 12 30.

(1) From Eight Mile Plains, Rochedale South, Springwood:
Take bus route 576, to the stop at Belmore Dr near Kallista Rd, Rochedale South. Walk 20mins to Chung Tian Temple at the end of Underwood Road.

(2) From Rochedale South, Eight Mile Plains, Garden City: Take bus route 578, to the stop at Exilis St near Finfoot St, Rochedale South. Walk 15mins to Chung Tian Temple at the end of Underwood Road.

Questions

Please call temple reception at (07) 3841 3511 or send us an email at info@fgschungtian.org.au

Note: Please do not send us spams or solicitation emails. We appreciate your understanding and consideration.

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Buddhism

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Buddhism

Buddhism is a way of life which is based on the profound and wholesome teachings of the Buddha to all people, revealing the true face of life and the universe. The Buddha did not preach to win converts but to enlighten listeners. It is a religion of wisdom where knowledge and intelligence predominate. Buddhism has brought peace of mind, happiness, and harmony to millions of people in its long history of more than 2,500 years.

Buddhism is practical religion devoted to conditioning the mind through a normal daily life in such a way as to lead to peace, tranquility, happiness, wisdom and perfect freedom. As a plan of living which derives the highest benefit from life, it is sometimes referred to as “Humanistic Buddhism.”

Words of Widsom

(Excerpts from Buddhist Sutras, teachings of Great Masters and the Wise)

Attitude in Learning Buddhism

“My teaching is not to come and believe but to come, see and practice.” (Buddha)

“Do not go by revelation or tradition, do not go by rumor, or the sacred scriptures, do not go by hearsay or mere logic, do not go by a bias towards a notion or by another person’s seeming ability and do not go by the idea “He is our teacher”.

But when you yourself know that a thing is good, that it is not blameable, that it is praised by the wise and when practiced and observed that it leads to happiness, and then follow that thing.” (Buddha)

Entry to Buddhism

“There are many ways to enter upon the Buddhist path, not just one way. The way that you choose will depend upon your interests and inclinations. There are, however, two things that must be present in whichever way you choose; the first is sincerity and the second is reverence. This fact will never change until the end of time. Anyone who wants to make progress toward enlightenment must understand this. If this is no understood, you will be like a tree without roots or a bird without wings. And if this is so, how can you ever expect to grow or to fly?” (Master Yin Kuang)

A True Buddhist

A Buddhist should be recognized by his moral character – thought, word and action. One who has thoroughly purified oneself with good thoughts, good words, and good deeds is a perfect Buddhist from the Buddhist point of view.
It is difficult to regard a person as a Buddhist, if he merely goes to a place of worship and prays only for the good of himself and his family, with little regard for others.

The idea of the Buddha exceeds divine power; you are in charge of your own destiny.
The idea of pure land can achieve the ideal of human rights; foster a state of equality.
If you can enjoy the Buddha’s teachings, you can resolve things.
If you observe the Buddha’s teachings, you can live at ease. (Ven. Master Hsing Yun)

“A truly cultivated person never sees the fault of others.”
(Master Hui Neng, the sixth Patriarch of Ch’an)
** In seeing the faults of others, we should behave like a blind person.
** In hearing unjust criticism of others, we should behave like a deaf person.
** In speaking ill of others, we should behave like a dumb person.
** It is not possible to put a stop to false accusations, reports, and rumors. (Buddha)

A Religion of Peace

Buddhism has taught peace among its followers more effectively, during all its history, than has other religious faith because Buddhism is the only religion with no bloodshed or violence. (Rev. J.T. Sunderland)

The practice of restraint of thought brings peace and harmony to the individual, and restraint of speech and bodily actions gives peace to others. It is through the mind that all evil or unwholesome actions are performed. If this mind within is well-guarded with attentiveness, then wars and conflicts without would naturally be kept in check.

True Blessings is knowing how to be satisfied with whatever one has is the ultimate refuge of peace and security. One who knows how to be satisfied with whatever he has can lie anywhere on the ground and feel completely contented. One who does not know how to be satisfied with what he has will feel that something is lacking even if he is in heaven; one, like this, is poor even though he may possess enormous wealth. One, like this, finds only entanglement and suffering in the operation of his senses, while one who knows how to be satisfied finds only comfort and joy in them. (The Sutra of Bequeathed Teachings)

True Faith

Faith is the source of the way and the mother of all virtue and merit. It increases all virtue and eradicates all doubts. It is the beginning of the supreme way. (Avatamsaka Sutra)

The essence of faith lies in the belief in the reality of the Buddha’s existence, in belief in the virtue of the Buddha, and in belief in the power of the Buddha. It also lies in the deep appreciation of the practitioner, in the joy of the practitioner, in the desire for the enlightenment of the practitioner, and in the purity of mind of the practitioner. Faith inspires one to find delight in goodness.
(Vijnaptimatratasiddhi Sastra)

The avoidance of all evil, the accumulation of the good, and the purification of one’s mind this is the teachings of all Buddhas. (Buddha).

Right Effort is the persevering endeavor
** To prevent the arising of evil and unwholesome thought that has not yet arisen in a man’s mind;
** To discard such evil thoughts already arisen;
** To produce and develop wholesome thoughts not yet arisen;
** To promote and maintain the good thoughts already present (Buddha)
** Giving up false speech, he becomes a speaker of truth, reliable, trustworthy, and a non-deceiver of the world.
** Giving up malicious speech, he does not repeat what he has heard in order to cause bickering between people. He reconciles those who are divided and brings closer those who are divided and brings closer those who are already friends.
** Giving up harsh speech, his speech is blameless, pleasing to the ear, agreeable, going straight to the heart and liked by most.
** Giving up idle chatter, he speaks at the right time what is correct and to the point, about Dharma, and about discipline. He speaks words worth being treasured, opportune, reasonable, well defined and to the point. (Buddha)

Law of Cause and Effect

According to the seed that is sown so is the fruit ye reap therefrom, Doers of goodwill gather good, Doers of evil will reap evil. Sown is the seed, and thou shalt taste, the fruit thereof.
(Buddha)

Good begets good and bad begets bad. We are the results of what we were, and we will be the results of what we are.
(Buddha)

All events in the universe have Causes and Conditions. The success or failure of any event is brought about by causes and conditions. Though there may appear to be a person outside of me who brings about the success or failure of something that I do, the truth is all events that impinge upon me are brought about by causes that I myself created sometime in the past. The appearance that some other person is doing something to me is just that it is just an appearance. If this point is well understood, one can be joyful and content at all times and one will not feel any resentment or any need to complain.
(Master Yin Kuang)

Karma (deed)

Karma is like the wind. Good karma blows sentient beings toward good places where they will experience joy. Bad karma blows sentient beings toward bad places where they will experience suffering. (Explanation of the Mahayana)

The power of karma is incredible; it exerts its influence over great distances. When the fruit of retribution has ripened, there is nowhere you can hide. (Collection of Rules)

All bad karma that I created in the past was created from beginningless greed, anger or ignorance. It was born from acts of body, mouth or mind. And now I repent it all. (Sutra)

** The greatest virtue is that gained in the cultivation of universal love.
** The supreme happiness is the happiness derived from mental tranquillity.
** The absolute truth is the truth acquired through the understanding of the causes of human suffering.
** The highest religion is the religion that teaches intellectual development, morality and mental purification.
** The greatest philosophy is the philosophy that introduces a practical way of life that can be followed without depending on theories and mere beliefs. (Buddha)

The Best Good Luck

* Being deeply learned and skilled; being well-trained and using well-spoken words; this is the best good luck.
* To support parents, to cherish a spouse and child and to adhere to a simple livelihood; this is the best good luck.
* Being generous, just, helping one’s relatives and being blameless in one’s actions; this is the best good luck.
* To refrain from evil and from strong drink, and to be always steadfast in virtue; this is the best good luck.
* Reverence, humility, contentment, gratitude and hearing the good Dharma; this is the best good luck. (Buddha)

Wherever the Buddha’s teachings have flourished, either in cities or the countryside, people would gain inconceivable benefits. The land and people would be enveloped in peace. The sun and moon would shine clear and bright. Wind and rain would appear accordingly, and there would be no disasters. The nation would be prosperous and there would be no use for soldiers or weapons. People would abide by morality and in accordance with the law. They would be courteous and humble, injustices would be eradicated and everyone would be content. There would be no thefts or violence. The strong would not dominate the weak and everyone would get their fair share. (The infinity of Life Sutra)

The Three Dharma Seals

1) The Truth of Impermanence – “That which is gathered together must scatter apart, and that which is high must fall down, and those who become companions must separate, and that which is born must die.” (Agamas)

2) The Truth of No Self-Nature – All things are devoid of a self-nature and depend on other things for their existence.

3) The Truth of Nirvana – Nirvana is the ultimate refuge. It is the true self and the Buddha-nature we seek. It is the extinction of suffering, elimination of egoism, and the eradication of lust, hatred, and ignorance.

Dependent Originations

Because of ignorance arise volitional (intentional) activities.
Because of volitional activities arise consciousness.
Because of consciousness arises mind and matter.
Because of mind and matter arise six senses.
Because of six senses arise contact.
Because of contact arises craving.
Because of craving arises attachment.
Because of attachment arise karma conditions.
Because of karma conditions arises birth.
Because of birth arises old age and death. (Buddha)

Life is Uncertain – Death is Certain

“Your property will remain when you die. Your friends and relatives will follow you up to your grave. But only good and bad actions you have done during your life-time will follow you beyond the grave.”

“Your wealth can decorate only your house but not you. Only your own virtue can decorate you. Your dress can decorate your body but not you. Only your good conduct can decorate you.” (Buddha)

Life is Impermanent. All Forms are Illusions.

“All conditioned dharmas are like dreams, like illusions, like bubbles, like shadows, like dew, like lightning, and all of them should be contemplated in this way.”

“One should disentangle himself from all marks, and commit himself to the highest complete enlightenment; he should not give rise to a mind based on form, and a mind based on sound, smell, taste, touch, or thought. He should give rise to a mind that is not attached to anything.” (Diamond Sutra)

Mind

“Use your mind to overcome your mind. If the mind becomes scattered and races off on its own, calmly bring it back to itself and contemplate that there is nothing beyond the mind.”
(Awakening of Faith in Mahayana)

“How should we purify the tendencies of our minds? Through deep introspection, contemplate the fact that the source of all good and all evil is nothing more or less than the mind itself. A single wicked thought can produce a plethora of evil consequences, while a single good thought can give birth to a wealth of good things.”
(Master Yung Chia)

Emptiness of All Things

“If you can truly get beyond attachment and the need to constantly cling to distinctions, and if you realize that the purity or impurity of all things is just relative conditions, then you will be in a position to understand that nothing has absolute wisdom, or absolute knowledge, or absolute being, or absolute non-being. Ultimate truth is beyond words. The Tathagata used words to describe this truth only because he wanted to teach sentient beings about it. If we cling to the meaning of words, they will increase our delusion and we will not see the truth.” (Awakening of Faith in the Mahayana)

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Temple Facilities

FO GUANG SHAN, Chung Tian Temple

Chung Tian Temple follows Chinese palace architectural style employing gold and red in the traditional manner of Chinese Emperors. The gold represents enlightenment while red is an auspicious color for Chinese, symbolizing happiness, prosperity, luck and energy. These colours provide an attractive contrast to the greens in the bush background. Visitors enter the Temple itself through the large red wooden doors at the top of a stone staircase. This construction symbolically depicts the journey upwards through the present life toward enlightenment as well as the ideal of Buddhist practice, following the ‘middle path.’ Appearing in the centre is a large courtyard leading to the Worship Hall, with function rooms on two sides.
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CHUNG TIAN TEMPLE ARCHITECTURAL STYLE

For historical reasons, traditional Chinese Temples are often of Chinese palace architectural style. Buddhism was introduced to China in the first century AD, following an invitation by Chinese Emperors to some Indian Masters to share their knowledge. The earliest Temple was built in the city of Loyang. This Temple was called White Horse Temple because the first sutras were delivered on a white horse. A Temple was originally a place for sutra (scripture) translation and Buddhist teaching. Since Temples in later times were usually built by Emperors for great masters, the palace style became the architectural style normally used in Temple construction.

Gargoyles or mythical figures protect some of the buildings. On the corners of the roof, a bird sits looking backward. This is the phoenix, considered to be a compassionate bird. The phoenix is a reminder that those who have achieved prosperity should look back and care for those less fortunate.
Dragon heads are also found on the high points of the roof. The dragon is the most ancient emblem in Oriental mythology, representing celestial and terrestrial power, wisdom and strength.

The two elephant statues in the front court represent endurance and a strong and steadfast character. According to Buddhist texts, Sakyamuni’s mother, Queen Maya, had a dream that a white elephant with six tusks entered her side – a sign of divine conception. Thus, a white elephant has long been associated with the origin of Buddhism.

Two lion statues at the front doors represent Buddhas and Bodhisattvas who are strong in mind and fearless. The lion’s roar is likened to a thunderous call which awakens all sentient beings to the power of the Dharma. These statues evoke the importance of the teachings of the Dharma and the superior strength of the mind. Traditionally, Chinese people like to place a lion couple at the front gate of their home – one male and one female – to create an appearance of grandeur and an image of a strong household.

BUDDHIST FLAG
The Buddhist flag is hoisted in the front court. The flag originated in 1952 at the Second World Fellowship of Buddhists Conference held in Japan. The five colors of the stripes in the design – blue, yellow, red, white and orange – represent the radiations emitted from the Buddha’s body after his enlightenment. They also symbolize various skin colors of people around the world. The horizontal stripes suggest harmony amongst all races, while vertical stripes represent world peace.

FOYER
In the foyer outside the Temple reception, there are two statues. A large bronze statue of Venerable Master Hsing-Yun faces outward while a statue of Maitreya, The Bodhisattva of Joy faces inward. Venerable Master Hsing-Yun is the founder of the Fo Guang Shan International Buddhist Order and the Buddha’s Light International Association for lay Buddhists. He was born in China in 1927 and was fully ordained at the early age of 14. In 1949, amid the turbulence of civil war, he went to Taiwan. He has traveled throughout the world to promote Humanistic Buddhism. Fo Guang Shan emphasizes education and services. It has established public universities, Buddhist colleges, libraries, publishing houses, Buddhist art galleries, free mobile clinics, children’s home, retirement homes and a television station. Venerable Master Hsing-Yun is recognized for his bold and innovative methods of spreading Buddhist teachings which meet contemporary needs.

The Bodhisattva Maitreya, who represents loving kindness, is often called the “Happy Buddha” and is expected to be the next Buddha to appear in this earthly world. A Bodhisattva is an enlightened person who is completely motivated by love and compassion for all sentient beings and commits oneself to liberate all beings from pain and suffering. Maitreya Bodhisattva once manifested himself as a rotund and generous monk in China centuries ago which is how he gained the Happy Buddha label. His big tummy represents his capacity for tolerance and acceptance, and his big smile represents the loving kindness he feels for all sentient beings. Incidentally, rubbing the tummy for good luck is not encouraged. Many consider that practice as merely a superstition and a disrespectful act.

BODHISATTVA HALL
The figure of Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva, The Bodhisattva of Compassion is centred onthe altar. In Chinese the Bodhisattva is known as Kuan Yin. The Bodhisattva has perfect and penetrating hearing to listen to all appeals. Kuan Yin’s manifestations are numerous in both male and female forms. The manifestation depicted in the Hall is the ‘Thousand Hands and Thousand Eyes Kuan Yin’ symbolising an immense capacity to see and help all beings in need.

In front of the altar are Dharma instruments: a round wooden fish on the left, a gong on the immediate right with a drum and a bell at the far right. The wooden fish is a wooden block carved with two big eyes and scales. Just as a fish never closes its eyes and is thus always ‘awake,’ one should similarly be acutely aware in earnest dedication to Buddhist practice. These instruments are played by the Monastic’s during services to lead the rhythm of chanting.

The displays on the altar represent the Buddhist way of giving and sharing. All offerings are made in admiration for the teachings of the Buddha, not as a form of worship. Offering incense can serve to purify the hall and our mind.ntricate pagodas meticulously made of match-sticks by prisoners, a statue of Sakyamuni Buddha practicing asceticism, items displaying micro-engraving, and replicas of well known Chinese treasures.

BLESSING BELL
An offering to Buddhist teachings may be made by ringing the large Blessing Bell in the centre court. There are many merits in striking the bell if the intention is to bring benefit to others. The following inscription is written on the bell:

Let the chime of the bell alleviate sufferings,
Cultivate wisdom and induce enlightenment.
Let those hearing it refrain from hell and the burning flame,
But vow for attainment of Buddhahood and delivering all sentient beings.

LOTUS TREASURY WORLD
This area represents Buddha’s world of peace, tranquility, and harmony. There are many lotus flowers, a strong symbol of Buddhism since the exquisite flowers develop from poor beginnings in marshlands. Lotus flowers are reminders that a pure mind may be cultivated within the turmoil of this world.

The mirrors at each side of the room reflect the Buddha nature of those who stand before them. Facing the mirrors, numerous images in front and behind are displayed, suggesting the continual cycle of samsara, birth, and rebirth, past lives and future. An additional message is that the present life is not a beginning nor an end but simply a stepping stone to enlightenment. In several profound ways, the room expresses many lessons of Buddhist sutras, including the Law of Cause and Effect and the principle of Dependent Origination.

MEDITATION HALL
Meditation is the fundamental practice of Buddhism; it promotes peace of mind, clarity in thinking, and the development of wisdom. The area provides space for regular meditation classes and retreats and many individuals engage in personal meditation here.

The Hall enshrines Sakyamuni Buddha, the founder of Buddhism. He was born more than 2,500 years ago as a prince in Northern India. To search for the truth of life, he left his privileged life at the age of 29. After six years of meditation and reflection, he achieved enlightenment. His wisdom revealed that all beings are potential Buddhas, each of whom has the ability to reach enlightenment through practicing his teachings.

SUTRA TRANSCRIPT ROOM
Buddhism stresses mind cultivation or ‘mindfulness.’ This can be practiced in a variety of ways including formal meditation, chanting, and sutra transcription. While originally the sutras were passed orally, sutra transcription originated in China before printing was invented. At that time hand- copying was required and it was considered that those who carried out this important task gained infinite merits. Nowadays the practice of transcription, also termed writing meditation also assists in purifying the mind by exercising concentration and has become an art form in its own right known as calligraphy.

Chinese writing or calligraphy has a rich linguistic meaning and aesthetic beauty. It encapsulates the tradition of more than 5,000 years of the evolution of Chinese characters. Considerable skill is required to write well with brush and ink and even a great calligrapher may take a lifetime to achieve mastery.

CONFERENCE ROOM
The conference room can accommodate 120 people. It is equipped with modern faculties and is an ideal of lectures and workshops.

MUSEUM
The Museum displays a wide range of beautiful Chinese arts and artifacts including Buddha and Bodhisattva statues from regions such as China, Thailand, Sri Lanka and Tibet. The fact that Buddhism has long been blended with local cultures in different areas is well illustrated by the facial resemblance of the statues to the people in the regions where they were made. There is also a souvenir shop which sells chanting beads, incense, candles, Buddhist books, CDs, and various other items. Other attractions include intricate pagodas meticulously made of matchsticks by prisoners, a statue of Sakyamuni Buddha practicing asceticism, items displaying micro-engraving, and replicas of well-known Chinese treasures.

CHUNG TIAN ART GALLERY
The Chung Tian Art Gallery aims at exhibiting arts and paintings with cultural and artistic value, both from local and overseas artists, to bring Eastern and Western cultures together to raise the cultural awareness in the community through art, both traditional and contemporary.

WATER DROP TEAHOUSE

“Repaying droplets of kindness with springs of gratitude”. A drop of water can nurture countless lives. The Teahouse provides visitors tranquil and comfortable surroundings to relax with light vegetarian meals and refreshments.

TEA ROOM
The Tea Room is intended to provide a peaceful haven for visitors as well as a setting in which to conduct the tea ceremony. Visitors are invited to help themselves to refreshment and/or to sit quietly with friends to reflect on the beauty of the Temple.

The Chinese Tea Ceremony is conducted for tour groups as part of a familiarization with Chinese culture as well as a means of meditation and respect for others. The Chinese were the first to discover tea leaves. They were also the first to make drinking of tea an art form.

Tea was known to be consumed in China as early as the 9th century BC. During the Spring and Autumn Period, people ate fresh tea leaves as vegetables. With the popularization of Buddhism from the Three Kingdoms to the Northern and Southern Dynasties, tea’s refreshing effect made it a favorite among monks in Za-Zou meditation. In the 8th century AD, tea was introduced into Japan by Buddhist monks as a means of keeping awake during meditation.

TEMPLE PAGODA
The Pagoda is set amongst the natural surroundings and with its traditional Chinese design is a peaceful and beautiful place to have a memorial to loved ones. Opened in 2007 by Venerable Master Hsing Yun who described it as helping to create the Pure Land in Australia, the Pagoda has seen many visitors who come to admire the Seven Level building.

The Pagoda has three halls. The Centre has a large Amitabha statue and represents the Pure Land. The ceiling with its Eight Celestial Beings conveys the ideal beauty of the Pure Land. The Western Hall has Amitabha Buddha seated on the Lotus throne. This hall is used for memorial services and to pay respects to ancestors and family. Around the walls are ceramic plaques of Amitabha Buddha that can be purchased as a memorial. The Eastern Hall has Ksitigarbha Bodhisattva – The Bodhisattva of Great Vows reminding us of our practice to keep vows and the Bodhisattva practice to help others. His vow was “Not until Hell is vacant shall I become a Buddha”. The walls are lined with plaques of Ksitigarbha Bodhisattva.

CHAN, ZEN & ARHAT GARDENS
The gardens contain statuary and plants chosen to create a peaceful ambiance while the presence of a Bodhi tree is indicative of the place at which the Buddha found enlightenment. Eighteen majestic Arhat statues are placed in the Garden Area.

An Arhat is a being who has traversed the Noble Eightfold Path and transcended samsara (the cycle of rebirth). Arhats are said to remain in this world to protect the Dharma (Buddhist teachings). They are often represented as possessing various kinds of supernatural power, symbolized either by objects held in their hands or by wild animals crouching submissively beside them.

The Venerable maintain a peaceful ambiance and conduct daily services with the chanting of Amitabha Buddha’s name. Visitors are welcome to pay respects and make offerings of incense, flowers, candles and fruit. During Dharma functions, the chanting merits are transferred to the deceased.

Pagoda

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Pagoda

Chung Tian Temple- Pagoda

Pagoda has its origin from the Indian stupa, an ancient type of building used to store sutras and sacred relics of the Buddha. With the spread of Buddhism to China, Chinese architectural elements from gate towers and various wooden structures were gradually incorporated into pagoda design.

Pagoda Pamphet

The seven-tiered style of Chung Tian’s Pagoda reflects a similar convention of the Tang Dynasty (A.D. 618-906). Its tapering design reaching the sky is synonymous with the idea of practicing Buddhism step-by-step which eventually led to supreme enlightenment.

Chung Tien’s Pagoda is set amongst the natural surroundings and with its traditional Chinese design is a peaceful and beautiful place to have a memorial to loved ones. Inside the Pagoda, the main shrine dedicated to Amitabha Buddha who vowed to help all beings from sufferings and reaching enlightenment. Visitors are welcome to pay respects and make offerings of incense, candles, flowers, and fruits.

Sutra Calligraphy Room

Chung Tian Temple - Sutra Translation RoomAs the sutras state: “Of all offerings, the offering of the Dharma is supreme.” One can purify the mind and develop character from the practice of calligraphy, letting one’s body and mind become righteous and true. This tradition is a creation and strong feature of Chinese Buddhism.

The sutras also state: “From transcribing the sutras one is able to accomplish great goals.” When transcribing the sutras, one writes each stroke, each letter, each word and each sentence with a heart of utmost sincerity. With a full commitment of body and mind and total concentration, one enters into a state of single-mindedness.

The Sutra Calligraphy Hall is located to the right of the Main Shrine in the pagoda. It is equipped with both traditional and modern Chinese calligraphy materials. The Sutra Calligraphy Hall is open to the public to come and transcribe the sutras.

Founder – Venerable Master Hsing Yun

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Founder – Venerable Master Hsing Yun

Master_Hsing_Yun_Pagoda

Venerable Master Hsing Yun is the founder of the Foguanshan Buddhist order (originated in Taiwan). His Dharma name, Hsing Yun, means ‘star cloud’ whilst Foguangshan means “Buddha’s Light Mountain”. After enduring poverty and oppression during World War II, he devoted his life to revitalizing Buddhism so that it belongs to the people – not just reclusive monastic orders.

Toward a Modern Buddhist Hagiography -Telling the Life of Hsing Yun in Popular Media

He has focused on reforming Buddhism to be:
* a spiritual path in tune with contemporary trends
* part of people’s lives
* making it accessible to all generations and geography

Venerable Master Hsing Yun is an energetic and dynamic person from humble beginnings, within his own lifetime he has developed a global organization – the Buddha’s Light International Association (BLIA) that has libraries, temples and free health clinics around the world in over 200 locations. He is recognized as a global Buddhist leader alongside peers like the Dalai Lama.

About Temple

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About Temple

CHUNG TIAN TEMPLE, also know as:International Buddhist Association of QLD (IBAQ)

Chung Tian Temple, which means “Middle Heaven”, was constructed in 1992 using traditional Chinese Buddhist architecture – it is situated between Brisbane and Logan, Queensland. Surrounded by nature, the Temple provides a peaceful and culturally beautiful venue for the community to celebrate its multicultural diversity and multi-faith harmony through Humanistic Buddhism.

Celebrations and Activities
The public are welcome to join in all activities:
Cultural and Multi-faith Celebrations1) Chinese New Year festivals, concerts and Chinese cultural arts performances (classical and contemporary dance, music, arts, and choirs).
2)Buddhas Birthday Festival:
free community event promoting and celebration Buddhism, attracting over 200,000 people (held in the first weekend of May annually at South Bank Parklands).
Education and Community access1) Meditation sessions, Buddhist services and Buddhist study classes for the public (beginners to advanced levels, classes held throughout the year).

2) Thousands of school students, tourists, dignitaries, and the public visit the temple every year.

Community Wellbeing programs1) Environmental awareness: planting trees and “Clean Up” days.
2) Charity and fundraising for medical research, children’s toys, and natural disaster appeals, etc.
Humanistic Buddhism

The founder of Buddhism, Sakyamuni Buddha, was born into this world. He cultivated himself in this world, attained awakening in this world, and shared with others the deep truths he realized in this world. The human world was emphasized in everything he did.

Why did the Buddha attain awakening as a human being?Why did the Buddha attain awakening as a human being, and not as a heavenly being, an asura, an animal, a ghost, or in hell? Taking this question one step further, why did the Buddha not attain awakening in the distant future or the forgotten past? Why did he choose our world and our time? There can only be one reason: the Buddha wanted the teachings of Buddhism to be relevant to the human world.

The Buddha’s life as a human being can serve as an inspiration and as a model for spiritual practice in our own lives. We call the teachings of the Buddha “Humanistic Buddhism” to emphasize that they can be integrated into all aspects of our daily lives. Humanistic Buddhism has six characteristics: 1. Humanity, 2. Emphasis on daily life, 3. Altruism, 4. Joyfulness, 5. Timeliness and 6. Universal.

Learn more about Humanistic BuddhismHumanistic Buddhism focuses on integrating spirituality into people’s daily lives and so becomes a ‘practical’ way of living. It is relevant to all aspects of life including relationships, education, environment, culture, economics, and politics whilst emphasizing personal peace, compassion, family and community harmony.
Vision & Principles of Chung Tian TempleThrough Master Hsing Yun’s vision of mutual understanding and peace, the Chung Tian Temple has four principles that guide its direction and activities.
1) Fostering talent through education
2) Promote Buddhism through cultural endeavors
3) Benefiting society through charitable programs
4) Purifying hearts and minds through Buddhist practice
Temple Facilities
Chung Tian Main Hall
BODHISATTVA HALL

Dedicated to Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva (Kuan Yin), and the manifestation of compassion within us all. In Chinese the Bodhisattva is known as Kuan Yin.


Blessing Bell

A Buddhist blessing bell in the temple courtyard. A reminder to herald peace and harmony. An offering to Buddhist teachings may be made by ringing the large Blessing Bell in the centre court.

Chung Tian Temple - Lotus Treasury World
Lotus Treasury World

The Lotus Treasury World located within the Tea Chan room contains lotus flowers with Buddha statues reminiscent of ‘floating on a sea of fragrant water’ – the world is in the palm of your hand.

Chung Tian Tempe - Meditation Hall
Meditation Hall

Meditation is the fundamental practice of Buddhism; it promotes peace of mind, clarity in thinking, and the development of wisdom. The Meditation Hall provides space for regular meditation classes and retreats and many individuals engage in personal meditation here.

Chung Tian Temple - Sutra Transcript Room
SUTRA TRANSCRIPT ROOM

Equipped with traditional and modern Chinese calligraphy material. A great way to experience oriental arts.

Chung Tian Temple - Conference Room
Conference Room

The conference room can accommodate 120 people. It is equipped with modern faculties and is an ideal of lectures and workshops.

Chung Tian Temple - Museum
Museum

The museum houses a substantial collection of Buddha and Bodhisattva statues, Dharma instruments, Chinese calligraphic works, paintings, crafts and other Asian artifacts.

Chung Tian Art Gallery
Chung Tian Art Gallery

The Art Gallery aims at exhibitions of different kinds of arts and masterpieces, and showcasing artworks and collections with cultural and artistic value, both from local and overseas artists, to bring Eastern and Western cultures together to raise the cultural awareness in the community through art, both traditional and contemporary.

Chung Tian temple - WaterDrop Teahouse
Water Drop Teahouse

“Repaying droplets of kindness with springs of gratitude”. A drop of water can nurture countless lives. The Teahouse provides visitors tranquil and comfortable surroundings to relax with light vegetarian meals and refreshments.

Chung Tian Temple - Tea & Chan
Tea Chan

The art of tea is a cultural activity involving the ceremonial preparation and presentation of tea. Buddhism combines the tea ceremony with meditation often known as Tea Chan. Chung Tian Temple has a special tea Chan room to welcome visitors where tea is served.

Tea Room

The Tea Room is intended to provide a peaceful haven for visitors having a cup of tea. Visitors are invited to help themselves to refreshment and/or to sit quietly with friends to reflect on the beauty of the Temple.


Temple Pagoda

The Pagoda has three halls. The Centre has a large Amitabha statue and represents the Pure Land. The ceiling with its Eight Celestial Beings conveys the ideal beauty of the Pure Land.

CHAN, ZEN & ARHAT GARDENS

Traditional Chinese gardens surround the temple with sculptured landscapes and plants. Gardens contain statuary and plants chosen to create a peaceful ambiance while the presence of a Bodhi tree is indicative of the place at which the Buddha found enlightenment. Eighteen majestic Arhat statues are placed in the Garden Area.

Water Drop Teahouse

Water Drop Teahouse

A Bowl of Pickled Vegetables

The Story About Fo Guang Shan Water Drop Teahouse

A bowl of pickled vegetables
A portion of compassion
A drop of water, A portion of gratitude

Venerable Master Hsing Yun, founder of Fo Guang Shan Buddhist Order, became a monastic at the age of 12. When he was 17 years old, he became gravely ill and was unable to have any food for two months. His teacher, Venerable Master Chi Kai specially arranged for a bowl of pickled vegetables to be delivered to him. During a time of extreme commodity scarcity, this was a very rare and precious gift. With every mouthful of this gift, Venerable Master Hsing Yun was acutely appreciative of his teacher’s love and concern and vowed his life to Buddhism to repay his teacher’s benevolence.

A small bowl of pickled vegetables has accomplished many causes and conditions. Just like a small droplet of water, it has nurtured countless of lives. Fo Guang Shan Water Drop Teahouse are set up around the world to manifest Venerable Master Hsing Yun’s ideal of “compensating droplets of kindness with springs of gratitude”. The tranquil atmospheres evoke a sense of spiritual generosity and purity.

At Fo Guang Shan Chung Tian Water Drop Teahouse, the surrounding garden and trees add to a sense of calmness and returning to nature. When sunlight comes in and the windows cast long shadows, the atmosphere becomes ideal for reading a book while sampling delicious and healthy vegetarian foods.